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How to make a Half Treble stitch

In my opinion this is not a very common crochet stitch but I like to use it when I really don’t want a sharp or deep drop between a double crochet and a treble crochet.  I use this stitch in my crochet pumpkin leaf tutorial and here is a tutorial on how to make this stitch:

You will yarn over (yo) twice on your hook (just as if making a treble stitch)  ~~  then insert your hook into the stitch or space according to your pattern directions  ~~  now yarn over (yo) again and pull through that loop (at this point you will have 4 loops on your hook ~~  yarn over (yo) and pull through the first 2 loops on hook  ~~  yarn over (yo) again and pull through the last 3 loops on hook.  I’ve included some pictures too:

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It just makes a subtle difference in the look of your leaf or whatever you are crocheting.

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HAPPY CREATING!!

How to do a Single Crochet

If you are a “newbie” to crochet,  then here’s a great demo on how to complete a single crochet stitch.  In a pattern, you will find that the abbreviation for a single crochet stitch is SC.

My example has been crochet using a large hook, size N and super bulky yarn, category 6, to try to give you the best visual that I can.

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I started with 12 chains and completed my first SC in the 2nd chain from the hook.  Insert your hook in the single top loop only of the chain to complete your actual first single crochet.   You will have 11 working stitches when that row is completed.  At the end of the row, I will chain 1 and turn and begin my next row of SC stitches inserting through both loops in new row. 

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HERE ARE STEP BY STEP DIRECTIONS ON HOW TO DO THE SC:

You will have one loop on your hook and insert it through both loops on the first stitch of the new row.  Remember, you do not want to go into the chain that you just made.  Once your hook has been inserted, yarn over (yo) your hook and bring that loop back through the double loop.  You now have two loops on your hook.  Yarn over (yo) again and pull that loop through both of the loops on your hook which will leave you with just one loop left on the hook.

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 You have just completed one single crochet (sc) stitch.  Continue in this fashion for a total of 11 stitches.  When you come to the end of your row, chain 1 and turn your work and repeat the above stitch information for another 11 stitches.  Keep repeating this process.

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Making a single crochet swatch is fun and you can create many things from just doing this one stitch.  A simple scarf, headband, bracelet, baby blanket whatever you want to make.

This is also a wonderful stitch to teach a child who wants to learn to crochet.  Use a large hook size, maybe H or I for a beginner or child, and a worsted weight to chunky yarn (category 4 or 5).  Easier to see the different loops that are created and easy to work with especially for little fingers and hands.

HAPPY CREATING!!

HDC or DC chainless foundation tutorial

Here’s another tutorial on the chainless foundation stitch showing how to begin using the double crochet (DC) and/or the half double crochet (HDC) stitches.  There are only 2 differences when beginning a project with these particular stitches from the single crochet (SC) chainless foundation.

The differences are that you begin your chainless foundation with 3 chain stitches for the HDC and 4 chain stitches for the DC.  Also,  you will yarn over before you insert your hook into the top of the 2 beginning chain loops.  Otherwise, you complete your stitches exactly the same:

  • Complete your required number of chain stitches 2 for SC, 3 for HDC, 4 for DC
  • Yarn over (skip this step for single crochet chainless foundation)
  • Insert hook in first and middle loops of last chain from hook
  • Yarn over and pull through those two loops
  • Yarn over and pull through first (top) loop completing chain stitch
  • Yarn over and pull through remaining two loops to complete SC or
  • Yarn over and pull through remaining three loops to complete HDC or
  • Yarn over and pull through top TWO loops, yarn over and pull through remaining two loops to complete DC

Here are pictures for the HDC, which I hope will help you if you are totally new to this technique:

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Here are examples pictures of completing a DC chainless foundation row:

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After completing steps to make your chain foundation stitch, yarn over and work the remaining stitches just like you would for a double crochet (dc) stitch.

If your project wants you to work in the round, be sure to leave yourself a 4-5 inch tail for joining seams when making your beginning chain stitches.  This is a super stitch for ribbing on clothing, hats, etc.  I have designed a beanie pattern using the chainless foundation stitch crocheting the beanie from the bottom to the top.  Have been making these and donating them to my local hospital (new maternity ward) and Martin Head Huggers organization as chemo caps.   If interested in making chemo caps, you can click on this link for patterns and information www.headhuggers.org.

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 HAPPY CREATING!!

 

 

SC Chainless Foundation Stitch Tutorial

I think this is one of the coolest stitches you need to have in your crochet dictionary.  It is a perfect stitch to do especially if you have a tendency to crochet your beginning chain a little too tight, which I seem to do!!  It is a little tricky for just the first stitch or two and I hope I can show you clearly enough so you can learn how to do this fabulous technique.  It is sometimes called Foundation Single Crochet (FSC) or referred to as Base CH/SC.

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Let’s begin the single crochet (sc) chainless foundation stitch.  My examples will be using a J hook and medium (category 4) worsted weight yarn.  Trying to make pictures large enough so you can see exactly what I am doing.

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Beginning:   Make a slip knot onto your hook and complete two (2) chains (ch).  Take a moment and look at how the chain stitch looks from the front and how it looks on the back side.  You will now want to pick up the top loop of the 1st chain made and slide it on your hook and pick up that middle loop which is on the back side of the 1st chain made and slide them on your hook .  So now you have three (3) loops on your  hook.

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You will yarn over and slip through the top two (2) loops on your hook, yarn over and go through first loop on hook (chain stitch just made), yarn over and go through both stitches on hook (single crochet stitch just made).

For me, reminding myself of these two steps helped me until I got my rhythm and the feel of this stitch because you are actually creating two stitch rows (a chain row and your beginning sc row) at the same time.  Cool, huh!!

 

 

 

 

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Second Stitch:    Your work will want to hang downwards (vertically), but you want to hold it sideways because that top edge becomes your chain row and what is below is your single crochet row.   You will pick up both the front and back loops of the next chain stitch, yarn over and pull both loops, yarn over again and pull through first (one) loop (chain stitch completed), yarn over and slip through both loops (sc completed).

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Third Stitch:  Continue exactly the same as you did for the second stitch and you will continue to crochet your chainless foundation just like this until you have the required numbers of chains needed for your pattern.

When you have reached the end of your foundation row, chain the required number of stitches you need to make your third row, no turning necessary.  But you will need to flip your work over so that you are continuing along the single crochet edge and not the foundation edge.   If continuing in a sc pattern, you would only need to chain one and make more sc stitches.  If needing to crochet a double crochet row (dc), you would crochet three (3) chains and then proceed making dc stitches.

Also, follow directions given in your pattern if you need to go through both loops, or front loop only, back loop only, etc.

At the end of your third row, you would turn to come back making the necessary stitches for your pattern and continue with the pattern directions.

Hope these examples help you to get started crocheting with a chainless foundation.  My next blog will show you how to create a HDC and DC chainless foundation.   🙂

HAPPY CREATING!!

 

Using the “magic” loop technique in a pattern

My newborn crochet pattern could also be created using the “magic” loop technique.  Just make your loop and crochet your 12 DC (double crochet) in the center of the loop, join with a SL (slip stitch) in the first DC and continue to follow pattern with round 2. SONY DSC

HAPPY CREATING!!

Crochet iCord

Knowing how to make a crochet iCord is another great technique to have within your stitch file.  It is a pretty simple repeat stitch pattern and you will find many uses for an iCord for your clothing, accessories, appliques, etc.

The basic concept is working with three chain stitches to form a tube.  So to begin you would crochet three chains stitches, then insert your hook in the second chain from hook, yarn over (yo) and pull through loop.  Repeat this step in the third chain from hook.

Made 3 chains, ready to insert into 2nd n 3rd chain from hook

Made 3 chains, ready to insert into 2nd n 3rd chains from hook

3 loops on hook, ready to begin making iCord

3 loops on hook, ready to begin making iCord

Now you want to slide off the first two (2) chains from your hook onto another holder like a knitting needle, chop stick, or a large tapestry needle.  I personally have success using a bamboo knitting needle.

Sliding on to your holder, knitting needle

Sliding on to your holder, knitting needle

Two stitches on holder and one one crochet hook

Two stitches on holder and one on crochet hook

 

 

 

 

 

 

Once you have those two chains placed on your holder, you will begin making a chain stitch (*yo and pull through the loop) with the remaining loop on your crochet hook.  Now slide your 1st chain stitch loop back onto your crochet hook, make a chain stitch (*) and then slide your 2nd chain stitch loop back onto your crochet hook, and again make a chain stitch (*).

YO ready to make 1st chain with loop on hook

Ready to make 1st chain with loop on hook, YO pull through loop

Sliding 2nd chain back onto crochet hook

Sliding 1st chain stitch loop back onto crochet hoo

You just keep repeating this process until your cord is the length that you want.  To fasten off, just do a yarn over and pull through the three loops on your hook, now cut your yarn and pull it through the last remaining loop on  your hook.

First row completed

First row completed

You can create different size iCords by varying your yarn weight and hook size.

Various sizes of iCords you can make

Various sizes of iCords you can make

 HAPPY CREATING!!

 

Variation on Crochet Seed Stitch

Whether knitting or crocheting, the seed stitch creates a neat bumpy look to accent your project.

The crochet technique for making a seed stitch is usually based on alternating a single crochet with a double crochet, which creates a strong, dense looking pattern.  My variation is created by alternating a half double crochet stitch and a treble crochet stitch.  This gives a more open look to your crochet design pattern.  Of course, type of yarn used and size of crochet hook will make different looks too.

 

1st row of alternating HDC and TR

1st row of alternating HDC and TR

For my sample, I used a Size H crochet hook and 100% cotton yarn.  You want to begin by chain stitching an odd number of chains, (I chained 21 stitches in sample).  Now make a HDC (half double crochet) in the 2nd chain from hook.  In the next chain, make a TR (treble crochet), in next chain make a HDC,  next chain a TR and so forth until to get to the end of your chain stitches.  If you started your first row with a HDC, you will end with a TR crochet and have 20 stitches in your row.

 

Turn, make a SL stitch in first stitch, CH 1 (counts as your first HDC), then continue in pattern – TR, HDC, TR, HDC, TR, making last TR stitch in top of CH 1 stitch from previous row.

Go thru both loops of previous row to make your HDC and TR stitches

Go thru both loops of previous row to make your HDC and TR stitches

So your pattern is alternating HDC and TR within each row as well as alternating HDC and TR vertically.   As you begin your next row, your first SL stitch and chain is your HDC made directly above the TR stitch made in the previous row.  Continue crocheting in this manner,  thus creating your seed stitch pattern.

Picking up CH stitch to create last TR stitch in row

Picking up CH stitch to create last TR stitch in row

Seed stitch pattern, close up

Seed stitch pattern, close up

Another pic of several rows of seed stitch variation pattern

Another pic of several rows of seed stitch variation pattern

HAPPY CREATING!!